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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Fracking Takes Center Stage in NC Senate Committee

Today, a North Carolina Senate committee examined the critical issue of fracking in the Tar Heel state.  Environmental advocates urged the committee to go slow.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

Growing Solar in North Carolina: Solar Power's Role in a Clean Energy Future

With sunlight on almost 250 days a year, solar energy is a real energy option for North Carolina.  Based on rate of growth in solar installations experienced in other states and countries, North Carolina can install enough solar power over the next two decades to supply 2 percent of the state’s electricity by 2020, and 14 percent by 2030.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

Working with the Sun: How Solar Power Can Protect North Carolina's Environment and Create New Jobs

Solar power can curb pollution, protecting public health and North Carolina’s environment. It can also drive North Carolina’s economy forward – creating jobs that can’t be outsourced, and launching new companies to manufacture and install solar power equipment. This report quantifies the benefits of developing North Carolina’s solar resources on a trajectory to supply 14 percent of the state’s electricity consumption by the year 2030. 

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

Obama Announces Landmark Mercury Standards

Raleigh, NC – Today, President Obama and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the first-ever nationwide standard for mercury and air toxics pollution from power plants. A record 907,000 Americans submitted comments on the standard, which is expected to cut toxic mercury pollution from power plants by 91 percent.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

America's Biggest Mercury Polluters

Power plants continue to release large amounts of toxic pollutants, including mercury, into our air. In 2010, two-thirds of all airborne mercury pollution in the United States came from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants. In other words, power plants generate more airborne mercury pollution than all other industrial sources combined.

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