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If a picture’s worth a 1,000 words then videos must be priceless | Jamie Lockwood

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Our coast and marine life are still impacted by this devastating event and are still at risk from other offshore drilling disasters. Americans from coast to coast recognized this, and decided to speak out. 

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Are North Carolina beaches safe for swimming?

With summer in full swing, water pollution can close North Carolina beaches or put swimmers' health at risk. Last year, bacteria levels at 93 North Carolina beaches indicated that water was potentially unsafe for swimming there on least one day, according to the new report Safe for Swimming? by Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center. The report comes as Congress is set to vote tomorrow on a major spending bill that includes an additional $11 billion for water infrastructure.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Statement: Decision to rollback NEPA is misguided and dangerous

Despite the critically important role the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) has played in protecting the environment, the Trump Administration today rolled back the key regulatory policy. As a result, certain construction projects that are not substantially funded by the government will no longer require federal environmental reviews. This will endanger wildlife and cause an increase in carbon dioxide emissions. 

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Adding a fourth “W:” Taking care of our people and planet in the time of COVID-19 | Drew Ball

This past weekend, many of us celebrated America’s Independence Day. To me, the Fourth of July always felt like the half-way point of the year. Needless to say, it’s been a stressful first half of 2020 with COVID-19. Now that society is starting to slowly open, and we are allowed to cautiously venture out, we are being encouraged to practice the three Ws: Wear a mask; wait 6 feet apart to avoid close contact; and wash your hands. Now I’d like to add a fourth W: “Waste not. Responsibly use reusables during this time.”

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Asheville, Raleigh and Charlotte highlighted in new report on solar power progress

Asheville is distinguished as a “Solar Star” for having a significant amount of installed solar energy capacity relative to other cities across the country, 89.5 watts per capita. The results are highlighted in the seventh edition of Shining Cities: The Top U.S. Cities for Solar Energy, a new report released today by Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center. It is the most comprehensive survey available of installed solar capacity in major U.S. cities.

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