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Adding a fourth “W:” Taking care of our people and planet in the time of COVID-19 | Drew Ball

This past weekend, many of us celebrated America’s Independence Day. To me, the Fourth of July always felt like the half-way point of the year. Needless to say, it’s been a stressful first half of 2020 with COVID-19. Now that society is starting to slowly open, and we are allowed to cautiously venture out, we are being encouraged to practice the three Ws: Wear a mask; wait 6 feet apart to avoid close contact; and wash your hands. Now I’d like to add a fourth W: “Waste not. Responsibly use reusables during this time.”

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Asheville, Raleigh and Charlotte highlighted in new report on solar power progress

Asheville is distinguished as a “Solar Star” for having a significant amount of installed solar energy capacity relative to other cities across the country, 89.5 watts per capita. The results are highlighted in the seventh edition of Shining Cities: The Top U.S. Cities for Solar Energy, a new report released today by Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center. It is the most comprehensive survey available of installed solar capacity in major U.S. cities.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

New Dirty Water Rule puts Cape Fear River and North Carolina’s drinking water at risk

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers have now revoked federal protection for thousands of waterways across North Carolina, as published in the Federal Register. With our ecosystems and drinking water at stake, Environment North Carolina will challenge the Dirty Water Rule in court.

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On the 10th anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon Spill, have we learned from the past? | Drew Ball

The BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico happened 10 years ago and many remember it like it was yesterday. The oil spill killed 11 people and spewed an estimated 210 million gallons of oil and 1.8 million gallons of chemical dispersants into the sea.  Sea turtles and seabirds were covered in thick sludge, struggling just to move and breathe. Fishing communities were sidelined, unable to cast their nets and secure their livelihoods. The tragedy killed hundreds of thousands of sea turtles, marine mammals and birds, and, to this day, left an area of the gulf seafloor twenty times the size of Manhattan polluted.  April 20th, 2020 marks the tenth anniversary and, as we observe this sad occasion, we are forced to ask ourselves: Have we learned from the tragedy? 

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Blog Post

On the 10th anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon Spill, have we learned from the past? | Drew Ball

The BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico happened 10 years ago and many remember it like it was yesterday. 

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