Global Warming Solutions

“We are the first generation to feel the sting of climate change, and we are the last generation that can do something about it.”

- Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee

The last generation

Years ago, many of us thought of global warming as something that would happen “someday.” As it turns out, “someday” is right now.

We’re fast approaching the point when scientists say climate change could tip toward catastrophe, with sea levels rising faster along our coasts, storms growing more powerful, and droughts and other forms of extreme weather more disruptive.

Credit: Leonard Zhukovsky/Bigstock

Of course, nobody wants to leave the next generation a world where heat waves, floods, droughts and worse are everyday events in an increasingly dangerous world.

If we accept, as we must, the broad scientific consensus that human pollution is accelerating these changes, then this is our challenge: stop putting carbon into the atmosphere, increase our energy efficiency, and repower our society with clean, renewable energy sources such as solar and wind.

The good news is that solutions like solar, wind and energy efficiency not only reduce carbon pollution. They also clean up our air, reduce asthma attacks, and promote energy independence.

 

Credit: Mavrick/Shutterstock

The actions the United States has taken to date are necessary — but not yet sufficient — to prevent a catastrophic rise in global temperatures. In order to keep global temperatures from rising more than 1.5°C — the international consensus target for preventing the worst consequences of warming — the U.S. must reach net zero emissions economy-wide by 2050.

Leaders at all levels of government across the United States must follow through with existing commitments to reduce pollution. Leaders at all levels of government should identify and pursue new policies to cut pollution. And the U.S. must play a leadership role in the global movement to limit global warming.

Credit: Staff

Protect our children's future

As Gov. Inslee pointed out, global warming is the challenge of our generation.

Protecting our children’s future requires us to stop dumping carbon into our atmosphere, and there’s no better place to start than with America’s No. 1 global warming polluters. 

Issue updates

News Release

Asheville & Durham Elected Officials and Advocates Speak Out Against Rollback of U.S. Clean Car Standards During COVID-19 Pandemic

Today, State Senator Mike Woodard (D-22) and State Representative Brian Turner (D-116) joined Dr. Robert A. Parr, DO, a Medical Advocate for Healthy Air for Clean Air Carolina, and Drew Ball, State Director for Environment North Carolina, to speak out against the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) rollback of U.S. clean car standards in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic. The virtual press conference was hosted by Environment North Carolina.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Statement: Senate committee releases ambitious new climate report

The Senate Democrats’ Special Committee on the Climate Crisis released a long-awaited report Tuesday, making the case for comprehensive climate solutions that would meet the goal of net zero carbon emissions by 2050. This scientific target, set in 2018 by the International Panel on Climate Change, would keep the Earth from warming more than 1.5 degrees, avoiding the worst impacts of global warming. 

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Trouble in the Air: North Carolina, Raleigh experienced 75 days of polluted air in 2018

Raleigh, North Carolina with over 1,362,540 people suffered through 75 days of poor air quality due to air pollution in 2018, according to a new report from Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center, Frontier Group and NCPIRG Education Fund. Statistics from 2018 represent the most recent data available. Air pollution increases the risk of premature death, asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts.

“No North Carolinian deserves to breathe one day of bad air---much less 75 days worth, ” said Jamie Lockwood, Climate and Clean Energy Associate with Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center. “Air quality will only get worse as our climate warms, so we have no time to lose. We must make progress toward clean air.”

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Blog Post

Climate Solutions Now | Andrea McGimsey

When Oxford Dictionaries chooses “climate emergency” as the word of the year for 2019, you know things are changing. Our children are inheriting a world vastly different and more dangerous than the one we grew up in, and we need to act on climate now. 

When Oxford Dictionaries chooses “climate emergency” as the word of the year for 2019, you know things are changing. Our children are inheriting a world vastly different and more dangerous than the one we grew up in, and we need to act on climate now. 

Yet as world leaders meet in Madrid this week to discuss progress towards cutting global warming pollution and hitting the targets of the historic international Paris Agreement, President Trump has vowed to pull our country out. 

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

New study: North Carolina is Facing Serious Recycling Challenges

Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center released a report that discusses the state of recycling in North Carolina and the possible solutions that exist.

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