News Releases

News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Asheville, Raleigh and Charlotte highlighted in new report on solar power progress

Asheville is distinguished as a “Solar Star” for having a significant amount of installed solar energy capacity relative to other cities across the country, 89.5 watts per capita. The results are highlighted in the seventh edition of Shining Cities: The Top U.S. Cities for Solar Energy, a new report released today by Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center. It is the most comprehensive survey available of installed solar capacity in major U.S. cities.

News Release | Environment North Carolina

New Dirty Water Rule puts Cape Fear River and North Carolina’s drinking water at risk

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers have now revoked federal protection for thousands of waterways across North Carolina, as published in the Federal Register. With our ecosystems and drinking water at stake, Environment North Carolina will challenge the Dirty Water Rule in court.

News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Trouble in the Air: North Carolina, Raleigh experienced 75 days of polluted air in 2018

Raleigh, North Carolina with over 1,362,540 people suffered through 75 days of poor air quality due to air pollution in 2018, according to a new report from Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center, Frontier Group and NCPIRG Education Fund. Statistics from 2018 represent the most recent data available. Air pollution increases the risk of premature death, asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts.

“No North Carolinian deserves to breathe one day of bad air---much less 75 days worth, ” said Jamie Lockwood, Climate and Clean Energy Associate with Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center. “Air quality will only get worse as our climate warms, so we have no time to lose. We must make progress toward clean air.”

News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

New report: Offshore drilling could bring onshore damages to North Carolina

The Trump administration has proposed opening much of the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans off the U.S. coast to offshore oil and gas drilling. The onshore infrastructure that is needed to support expanded offshore drilling poses dangers to the environment, communities and public health.
Offshore drilling requires a supporting network onshore, including pipelines to deliver oil and gas to refineries or distribution networks; refineries to produce gasoline and other petroleum products; ports for sending equipment and maintenance boats to offshore rigs; and waste disposal facilities.
 
Onshore infrastructure and activities that support offshore drilling create multiple risks to public health and the environment, including air pollution, groundwater contamination and oil spills.

News Release | Environment America Research & Policy Center

102 groups urge EPA to rein in meat and poultry processing plant pollution

Environment America Research & Policy Center is submitting comments on behalf of 102 organizations today, urging the Environmental Protection Agency to dramatically reduce the massive levels of pollution dumped by agribusiness facilities into America’s waterways. The comments are in response to the agency’s decision not to update permit standards for meat and poultry plants -- despite the Clean Water Act’s requirement to do so.

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