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Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

America's Dirtiest Power Plants

Global warming is one of the most profound threats of our time, and we’re already starting to feel the impacts – especially when it comes to extreme weather. From Hurricane Sandy to devastating droughts and deadly heat waves, extreme weather events threaten our safety, our health and our environment, and scientists predict things will only get worse for future generations unless we cut the dangerous global warming pollution that is fueling the problem.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

Recovering With Solar

Combine the planet’s original energy source—the sun—with a simple, age-old technology, and you get reduced energy costs and less global warming pollution.  That’s the calculation Mecklenburg County and dozens of local governments are making, according to a new report by Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

Growing Solar in North Carolina

With sunlight on almost 250 days a year, solar energy is a real energy option for North Carolina.  Based on rate of growth in solar installations experienced in other states and countries, North Carolina can install enough solar power over the next two decades to supply 2 percent of the state’s electricity by 2020, and 14 percent by 2030.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Sen. Hagan, Reps. Price and McIntyre advocate for offshore wind

Raleigh – Sen. Kay Hagan and Representatives David Price and Mike McIntyre have joined the call for offshore wind development in North Carolina. 

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

North Carolina takes another step towards offshore wind

Wilmington– Offshore wind supporters packed the public hearing room Wednesday at the Courtyard Marriott in Wilmington as North Carolina took another step towards getting the first wind turbines spinning off our coasts.

The hearing was the second of two conducted by the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) to gauge public interest in offshore wind development in North Carolina. The meeting was an opportunity for the public to learn about the next steps we need to take to make offshore a reality in North Carolina and comment about the plan in place.

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